No Ocean Too Wide Cover Design

Hi Friends, Only two weeks until the release of No Ocean Too Wide! I’m very excited to share this new story with you. Here’s what author Roseanna White said about it, “In this heartwarming story about the lengths to which a family will go to protect one another, Turansky deftly weaves a tale that combines a sometimes shocking history with a tender romance. This beautiful story will breathe hope into readers’ hearts.”

I come from a family of artists, and I was a fine arts major in college, so the cover design of my novels is very important to me. I’m grateful the team at WaterBrook Multnomah allows me to have some input on my covers, but it’s not all up to me. There are many people who give input as the cover comes together and is finalized, and I thought you might enjoy seeing some of the steps in designing the cover for No Ocean Too Wide

Back in August of 2018 I filled out the author questionnaire for my publisher and included a link to my Pinterest board with images of my characters and the settings. I also showed them two covers I liked and explained why I liked them. The heroine takes a journey across the Atlantic from England to Canada, and there is a hint of mystery as she searches for her siblings. I thought these two covers reflected the kind of feeling I was hoping for, plus I loved the color scheme of The Daughter of Sherlock Holmes.

 

 

In October of 2018 I started exchanging emails with Kristopher Orr at WaterBrook who has designed all the covers for my English historical novels. He shared the painting below with me, and we discussed the idea of showing the heroine on board a ship. He asked if I had a particular ship in mind, and I sent him an old postcard of a steam ship from that time period.

Kristopher discussed his ideas with the team at WaterBrook, and after many hours of work he sent me the first cover below left. I loved the color scheme and the heroine’s dress and hat, but I asked him to lighten her hair and brighten the sky for more contrast. I didn’t feel the ship at the bottom fit in well with the rest of the design, so I sent him more ship images. Kristopher made a few more changes to the design. My editor sent me the “final cover” on the right, and I was thrilled. Even though I was on vacation, I shared the cover online that afternoon, and the response was very encouraging. My readers loved it and shared it all over social media. 

 

That evening I received an email that said they were pulling that cover and looking for a new design. I was surprised and uncertain what to do about all those posts and shares, but I kept quiet until we had a new “final cover.” 

A phone call from my editor helped me understand why they were making the change. WaterBrook is a division of Random House, and the team in New York felt a design that focused on the children in the story would make a stronger statement and give No Ocean Too Wide a broader appeal. Now that I see the final image, with the ship more set off in the fog and the children larger and brighter, I see their point.  

 

No Ocean Too Wide is a richly woven novel of heartache and hope that shines a light on the unjust child emigration scheme that sent more than 100,000 poor and orphaned children from England to Canada between the years of 1869 and 1939. I hope you’ll preorder your copy so you can be one of the first to read it when it releases June 25th! Stop by my website to learn more about the story and to order your copy.

Until Next Time, Happy Reading,

Carrie

Across the Blue Cover Design

Hi Friends, Only about one month until the February 20th release of Across the Blue! I’m very excited to share this new story with you, and I thought you might enjoy seeing what was involved in creating the beautiful cover.

In December 2016 I filled out an author questionnaire and sent cover ideas to the team at WaterBrook. At that time I’d only written about 1/3 of the book! I created a Pinterest board for my book and saved images of the setting, characters, and clothing. These images helped me picture the story as I was writing, and they were a great resource for the cover design team. 

In April  2017 Kristopher Orr, the designer at WaterBrook who has created all my lovely covers, started corresponding with me via email. We wanted the cover to truly reflect the time period and the story, and that takes time and research as well as great design skills. They planned to rent a costume for the photo shoot, so they showed me these three outfits and asked me which one I thought would look the best. I chose the ivory suit in the middle. The story takes place in the spring and summer, so the light color and Edwardian style looked like something Bella Grayson would wear.

We needed a different hat than the one pictured, so we contacted our friend Darna as East Angel Harbor Hats. She has designed special hats for my last three book cover shoots. And once again, she rose to the challenge in record time and sent us this lovely hat.

Sophia Alessi, from the Donna Baldwin Agency, was chosen as the model for the photo shoot, and she did a great job portraying Bella!

 

 

A few more months passed, and I eagerly waited to see the final cover design. They sent me these four mock ups and asked for my input. I liked them all, but I felt the fourth design was the strongest. The color, the type, and the photos all worked together to create a stunning design. The team at WaterBrook agreed, and they moved ahead to finalize the cover for Across the Blue.

 

Adding the back cover copy and the spine is the final step in the cover design process. Here’s a peek at those elements.

So, what do you think? Did you realize all that went into designing a cover? I’m grateful to Kristopher and the team at Waterbrook for “dressing” Across the Blue so beautifully!

I hope you’ll pre-order your copy of Across the Blue so you can have it in your hands the day it releases!

Happy Reading,

Carrie